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Diigo and Ripples March 30, 2008

Posted by Steve in : Elearning, hz08, Musing, Web2.0 , trackback

It has been some week in the annals of information technologies and those considered to be a Web2.0 entity.

I was able to get quite a discussion going in my Year 9 Information Software and Technology class. A question came up that was something like, “Why should it be a big thing that we download music and the such for free?” The resulting discussion was very impressive and we went quite in depth. One of the better questions was, “Why is it that so many law abiding, ordinary citizens have used software to download so many television shows from Europe and North America?” I’ll let your imagination run with that one.

valuesexchange2.gifThose students that have been involved in the Values Exchange program were pleased that they were able to add their comments and were somewhat surprised that topics from another subject area may be relevant to other subject areas. Ah, they are beginning to see outside their eye blinkers.

horizonproj08_1.pngI was able to contribute a wee little bit to the Horizon Project 2008. There was a request from the Horizon organisers for a teacher to facilitate a wiki page where the focus was on safe use of the nings and wikis that were being used for the project. I volunteered to carry out the request. On the wiki page I even created an animated gif which I had to learn how to do in Photoshop CS3. The teachers seemed to be impressed with the tone of the page. Strangely, no student as actually contributed to the wiki page indicating specifically what should be written or not in regards to safe use of a ning or wiki eg. user first name with surname initial only NOT first name and surname fully. Having said that, I noticed the students had amended many of their entries.

I was unable to participate in the Horizon Project 2008 weekly Elluminate meeting but I did watch the recording which was very informative. There was a request to proofread their initial 5 templates that will eventually expand to 65. I did find a couple of “typo” errors. It was easier to fix the same type three times as compared to 65 times! Again, I was able to contribute just a little bit.

I noticed that the Judges link became active and I have been the first to jump in and list my name as a Judge for the Collective Intelligence section. I chose that because it was one of the two case studies that I submitted to the Values Exchange pilot program. I next book marked a few web pages that may have a bearing on collective intelligence which in turn will be listed through a RSS feed on the Horizion Project 2008 wiki pages.

Standardised tagging strategies are being used in the Horizon Project. If one enters: http://del.icio.us/tag/hz08+collectiveintelligence, a listing of book marks world wide which have been tagged with hzo8 and collectiveintelligence are listed. This is a very powerful mechanism.

During the course of events with the Horizon Project 2008, it was announced that the keynote speaker would be Dan Tapscott, author of Wikinomics. So off to Sydney I went on Saturday to purchase the text and I also ordered via Amazon, “Look Both Ways, Help Protect Your Family on the Internet” by Linda Criddle. This was a result of the safety issues raised and the text was mentioned by Vickie Davis.

diigo1.pngOver the weekend, I investigated Diigo. It was taking the world by storm in terms of acceptance and people joining it. Seemingly, I was one of the first to gain membership. The site seems to streamline and bring a lot of activities that are carried out by other applications to just one place. I like that! While I am a convert to it and will abandon Delicious, I would not necessarily make use of it in the classroom because Diigo is a social networking entity and that is very sensitive to many parents. Some of things it does includes:

These are a few of its abilities and my sub-conscious will be processing all the experimentation that I have carried.

Phew, what a week!

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Comments»

# Vicki Davis - March 30, 2008

You have abeen a GREAT contributor to the project and we appreciate it so much! This is the kind of virtual volunteerism that many of us are doing — contributing to things and all helping a little.

I’m very impressed with what you’re doing and hope that you could join one of our projects in the future!

# Clix - March 31, 2008

One of the better questions was, “Why is it that so many[otherwise] law abiding, ordinary citizens have used software to download so many television shows from Europe and North America?”

David Callahan’s The Cheating Culture: Why More Americans Are Doing Wrong to Get Ahead discusses that question (among others) quite well, IIRC.

But it isn’t without precedent. I see it kind of like speeding – as long as you are somewhat restrained in your lawbreaking, it’s okay and you won’t be punished for it.

# Traci - April 1, 2008

Good question – Why is it that so many law abiding, ordinary citizens have used software to download so many television shows from Europe and North America? I would be curious to know their PERSONAL responses since I would think that many students see nothing wrong with it (hence, your first question – Why should it be a big thing that we download music and the such for free?) but could be critical of it when other people do it. Or, if they change their minds and STOP downloading, how long would that continue? I think ethical and moral decisions will begin to come more and more to the forefront as we look at Web 2.0 technologies. Along with collaboration and networking that occurs, what about the responsibilities of net-etiquette and the ability to self-police (since outside forces won’t be happening – good or bad) what happens within online interactions? I think that realm also should be coupled with the “flat” educational experiences of the future.

# sam khan - July 13, 2014

It was very good

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